Seeing Fake Places and Made Up Faces

Dreams and daydreams reveal random, nonsensical imagery that soon fades from our conscious memories. There are websites, books, and psychoanalysts who persuade their audiences that the random imagery is not so random because there is some sort of symbolism involved. Throughout our existence, we see fake places and made up faces. But is it all pointless to not live entirely in real life?

Fantasy can be quite lifesaving. After repetitive, mediocre routines are done again and again, a desire to live a very different life begins to appear. We can for a moment escape from a job or town that is hated so much. Unlike real life, the land of illusion has absolute freedom. Such freedom doesn’t require lots of money, planning, or realism. There is no need for a sense of morality either if you desire that. We can also forget about our worries for a moment. Our daydreams can be quite powerful.

Travel undoubtedly opens new opportunities and perspectives. In our dreams we can see London that bears different dimensions from its real-life version. London’s buildings can be nearly identical with small, hidden places crunched together. Like a child, we search around for a life full of fantastical possibilities. Our dreams can also reveal locations, such as an abandoned castle featuring a carefored botanical garden. From afar, a beach with a purple tint is seen.

Real-life doesn’t always allow for extensive travel. But some local walks have the potential to awaken gratefulness. A change in scenery reminds us of how insignificant our daily thoughts and concerns can be. Regardless of where you are emotionally or physically, the world slowly moves on. Anyone can only make a difference in our small world, in our hearts.

We can achieve a sense of closure thanks to our fantasy. Some situations require our silence. When you’re angry at someone, you can finally tell them exactly how you feel. A number of heavy pillows can be thrown at them. The fantastical argument that involves name-calling or something more will never transfer over to the real world without real action of course. We can finally have our final say without actual consequences.

In our fantasies or dreams, there are moments when we see the faces of people who don’t exist. We’ve seen them in bars, concerts, and museums that likely never stood on Earth. Based on their roles, these made up people may have a combination of ideal features that we’ve seen before such as plump lips, thick eyelashes, or a well-maintained physique. Other times, we get the impression that we’ve come across them in real-life.

Their voices are often times nonsensical and they are often heard from a distance. As we grew up, they might have been our imaginary best friends, lovers, and maybe even murderers.

Once their real-life counterparts make an appearance, we likely forget about our creations forever. The importance of real life always overrides that of fantasy.

What-if scenarios can very often trigger hard-felt anxiety. In ​The Secret Life of Walter Mitty​, the audience is introduced to a weak man who has vivid visions from his very different identities. In both the 1939 short story and the 2013 film version, strangers mock him for living inside a fantasy world. Some days bring forth personal darkness as the unreal images can instead trigger an obsessive glare at what has happened and fear for what will never come. Balance is key.

Daydreaming can help us move forward because it can motive us. Real life has its amazing moments that are hard to describe in just a few simple words. The times when we felt that happiest are often times not the most cinematic. The moments might have lasted a few seconds even, yet we might wish to experience them repeatedly with just a few readjustments.

Don’t reject fantasy, but try not to overstay there since there is the threat to succumbing to bitterness.

LISTEN: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1JuOFmN_X48ck8IuL-K0v4F3QvcZqInyU/view?usp=sharing

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